Archive for December, 2011

December 31, 2011, 1:08 PM EST

By Tom Stoukas

Dec. 31 (Bloomberg) — Nearly eight in 10 Greeks say the country’s leaders should do whatever is needed to remain in the euro and a majority say elections should be held by April, an opinion poll showed.

Of the 1,004 people surveyed Dec. 28-29 by Kapa Research, 77.2 percent said leaders should take all measures to remain in the euro zone while 16 percent said they preferred a return to the drachma. The poll was published in the Sunday edition of To Vima newspaper.

On asked when an election should be held, 56.2 percent said it should be held in April after negotiations over a debt swap with holders of Greek debt is completed, while 37.7 percent favored the polls at the end of the governemnt’s term that expires in 2013.

Nearly seven in 10, or 66 percent, of those surveyed had a positive view of Prime Minister Lucas Papademos, appointed on Nov. 11 as head of a government backed by three of the five parliamentary parties. Former Prime Minister George Papandreou had an approval rating of 18.8 percent, while New Democracy leader Antonis Samaras polled 35 percent.

Papademos is trying to secure loans under a 130 billion- euro ($168.5 billion) bailout for Greece agreed to by European Union leaders before elections are held. Measures include negotiating a debt swap with private creditors that will cut 100 billion euros off Greece’s burden.

If elections were held next week, the Pasok party led by Papandreou would garner the support of 12.6 percent of those polled, while the New Democracy Party, headed by Antonis Samaras, would be the choice of 21.4 percent. The nationalist Laos party, which is also part of the interim government along with Pasok and New Democracy, was backed by 5.3 percent. Nearly 30 percent were undecided.

The Communist Party of Greece would receive 9.3 percent of the vote and the Coalition of the Radical Left, or Syriza, would get 6.2 percent, the poll suggested. Both Syriza and the Communist Party declined to join the interim government.

The survey had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.09 percentage points.

–Editors: Shaji Mathew, Mike Harrison

To contact the reporter on this story: Tom Stoukas in Athens at astoukas@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Angela Cullen at acullen8@bloomberg.net

Article source: http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-12-31/most-greeks-prefer-to-remain-in-euro-early-election-poll-shows.html

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Nearly eight in 10 Greeks say the
country’s leaders should do whatever is needed to remain in the
euro and a majority say elections should be held by April, an
opinion poll showed.

Of the 1,004 people surveyed Dec. 28-29 by Kapa Research,
77.2 percent said leaders should take all measures to remain in
the euro zone while 16 percent said they preferred a return to
the drachma. The poll was published in the Sunday edition of To
Vima newspaper.

On asked when an election should be held, 56.2 percent said
it should be held in April after negotiations over a debt swap
with holders of Greek debt is completed, while 37.7 percent
favored the polls at the end of the governemnt’s term that
expires in 2013.

Nearly seven in 10, or 66 percent, of those surveyed had a
positive view of Prime Minister Lucas Papademos, appointed on
Nov. 11 as head of a government backed by three of the five
parliamentary parties. Former Prime Minister George Papandreou
had an approval rating of 18.8 percent, while New Democracy
leader Antonis Samaras polled 35 percent.

Papademos is trying to secure loans under a 130 billion-
euro ($168.5 billion) bailout for Greece agreed to by European
Union leaders before elections are held. Measures include
negotiating a debt swap with private creditors that will cut 100
billion euros off Greece’s burden.

If elections were held next week, the Pasok party led by
Papandreou would garner the support of 12.6 percent of those
polled, while the New Democracy Party, headed by Antonis
Samaras, would be the choice of 21.4 percent. The nationalist
Laos party, which is also part of the interim government along
with Pasok and New Democracy, was backed by 5.3 percent. Nearly
30 percent were undecided.

The Communist Party of Greece would receive 9.3 percent of
the vote and the Coalition of the Radical Left, or Syriza, would
get 6.2 percent, the poll suggested. Both Syriza and the
Communist Party declined to join the interim government.

The survey had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.09
percentage points.

To contact the reporter on this story:
Tom Stoukas in Athens at
astoukas@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Angela Cullen at
acullen8@bloomberg.net

<!—->

Article source: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-12-31/most-greeks-prefer-to-remain-in-euro-early-election-poll-shows.html

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Dec
31

Chronology of news events in 2011

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(AP) – NOVEMBER

Nov. 1

— Europe’s days-old plan to solve its crippling debt crisis and restore faith in the global economy is thrown into chaos by the Greek prime minister’s stunning decision to call a referendum on the country’s latest rescue package.

Nov. 2

— Syria accepts an Arab League proposal calling for it to withdraw armored vehicles from the streets and stop violence against protesters in a bid to end the country’s seven-month-old political crisis, an agreement that is met with deep skepticism by Syria’s opposition.

Nov. 3

— Greece is in turmoil and the world economy in limbo as a high-stakes game of political brinkmanship in Athens leads Prime Minister George Papandreou to abandon his explosive plan to put a European rescue deal to a referendum.

Nov. 4

— A Syrian peace plan brokered by the Arab League unravels as security forces kill 15 people, opening fire on thousands of protesters who denounce President Bashar Assad and says he never intended to hold up his end of the deal to end the violence.

Nov. 5

— Tens of thousands of opposition activists demonstrate in central Rome for the ouster of Premier Silvio Berlusconi.

Nov. 6

— Greece’s embattled prime minister and main opposition leader agree to form an interim government to ensure the country’s new European debt deal, capping a week of political turmoil that saw Greece face a catastrophic default that threatened its euro membership and roiled international markets.

Nov. 7

— President and one-time Sandinista revolutionary Daniel Ortega is re-elected in Nicaragua in a landslide, overcoming a constitutional limit on re-election and reports of voting problems.

Nov. 8

— Premier Silvio Berlusconi promises to resign after Parliament passes economic reforms demanded by the European Union, capping a two-decade political career that has ended with Italy on the brink of being swept into Europe’s debt crisis.

Nov. 9

— Uncertainty over who will lead Italy through the debt crisis once Premier Silvio Berlusconi resigns sends Italian borrowing rates through the roof and slams stock markets and the euro as the European debt crisis enters a dangerous new phase that could spell ruin for the euro as well as the global economy.

Nov. 10

— Europe’s financial crisis eases as Greece installs a respected economist to replace its prime minister and Italy appears poised to do the same — both hoping that monetary experts can do better than the politicians who drove their nations so deeply into debt.

Nov. 11

— The U.N. atomic agency shares satellite images, letters and diagrams with 35 nations as it seeks to underpin its case that Iran apparently worked secretly on developing a nuclear weapon. Iran’s chief envoy to the International Atomic Energy Agency rejects the presentation as fabricated.

Nov. 12

— Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi resigns after parliament’s lower chamber passes European-demanded reforms, ending a 17-year political era and setting in motion a transition aimed at bringing the country back from the brink of economic crisis.

Nov. 13

— Syria’s embattled regime calls for an urgent Arab summit as it faces growing isolation, not only by the West but also by its neighbors, who voted to suspend Syria from the Arab League over its bloody crackdown against an eight-month uprising.

Nov. 14

— German Chancellor Angela Merkel calls for a stronger “political union” in Europe to overcome the bloc’s debt crisis, which she described as “maybe Europe’s most difficult hours since World War II.”

Nov. 15

— Six Palestinian activists, clutching national flags and surrounded by dozens of reporters, are dragged off an Israeli bus they planned to ride into Jerusalem after a standoff with police.

Nov. 16

— President Barack Obama says he will send military aircraft and up to 2,500 Marines to northern Australia for a training hub to help allies and protect American interests across Asia. China, a rising power in the region, immediately questions the U.S. move and says it deserves further scrutiny.

Nov 17

— The Pakistani government says that it has not decided whether to accept a resignation offer from its ambassador to the U.S. over a reported attempt to enlist Washington’s help to rein in the country’s military after the American raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

Nov. 18

— Syria agrees in principle to allow dozens of Arab observers into the country to oversee a peace plan, a significant concession from a hardline regime that loathes any sort of outside interference.

Nov. 19

— Moammar Gadhafi’s former heir apparent Seif al-Islam is captured by revolutionary fighters in the southern desert just over a month after his father was killed, setting off joyous celebrations across Libya and closing the door on the possibility that the fugitive son could stoke further insurrection.

Nov. 20

— Spain’s opposition conservatives sweep commandingly into power and into the hot seat as voters enduring a 21.5 percent jobless rate and stagnant economy dump the Socialists — the third time in as many weeks Europe’s debt crisis has claimed a government.

Nov. 21

— Egypt’s army-appointed government resigns, trying to stem a spiraling crisis as thousands of protesters clash with security forces in Cairo’s Tahrir Square for the third straight day — deadly violence that poses the most sustained challenge yet since the military took control of the country in February.

Nov. 22

— Pakistan’s envoy to Washington loses a battle with the country’s powerful generals to keep his job over allegations he wrote a memo seeking U.S. help in stopping a supposed coup in the aftermath of the American raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

Nov. 23

— Yemen’s authoritarian President Ali Abdullah Saleh agrees to step down amid a fierce uprising to oust him after 33 years in power. The U.S. and its powerful Gulf allies pressed for the deal, concerned that a security collapse in the impoverished Arab nation was allowing an active al-Qaida franchise to gain a firmer foothold.

Nov. 24

Germany deflects calls for the European Central Bank to play a bigger role in solving Europe’s debt crisis but wins the backing of France and Italy to unite the troubled 17-nation eurozone more closely.

Nov. 25

— The U.S. increases pressure on Egypt’s military rulers to hand over power to civilian leaders, and the generals turn to a Mubarak-era politician to head a new government in a move that fails to satisfy the more than 100,000 protesters who jammed Tahrir Square in the biggest rally yet this week.

Nov. 26

— Pakistan blocks vital supply routes for U.S.-led troops in Afghanistan and demands Washington vacate a base used by American drones after coalition aircraft allegedly kill 24 Pakistani troops at two posts along a mountainous frontier that serves as a safe haven for militants.

Nov. 27

— In an unprecedented move against an Arab nation, the Arab League approves economic sanctions on Syria to pressure Damascus to end its deadly suppression of an 8-month-old uprising against President Bashar Assad.

Nov. 28

— Egyptians cast aside worries over a new wave of unrest and wait patiently and peacefully in long lines to vote in the first parliamentary elections since President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster, determined to reap the fruits of their uprising and have their choices count after decades of rigged polls.

Nov. 29

— Hard-line Iranian protesters storm British diplomatic compounds, taking down the Union Jack, torching an embassy vehicle and pelting buildings with petrol bombs in what began as an apparent state-approved show of anger over the latest Western sanctions to punish Tehran for its nuclear program.

Nov. 30

— The central banks of the wealthiest countries, trying to prevent a debt crisis in Europe from exploding into a global panic, sweep in to shore up the world financial system by making it easier for banks to borrow American dollars.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Article source: http://money.msn.com/business-news/article.aspx?feed=AP&date=20111231&id=14656397

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ΓΙΩΡΓΟΣ ΠΑΠΑΝΔΡΕΟΥ ΠΑΣΟΚ ΠΑΠΑΝΔΡΕΟΥ PASOK GIORGOS PAPANDREOU PAPANDREOU ΓΑΠ